Harold & Kumar, The Square Root of Three

by Bob Plankers on April 29, 2008 · 32 comments

in General Rambling

I saw “Harold & Kumar Escape From Guantanamo Bay” tonight. Pretty funny, but not as good as “Harold & Kumar Go To White Castle” in my opinion. The end is terribly anticlimactic. NPH does a good job, though. Mmm, unicorns.

Kumar does recite a poem by David Feinberg, “The Square Root of Three,” which I thought bears more attention since it’s my kind of dorky. Props to FilmChat for having a copy.

I fear that I will always be
A lonely number like root three

The three is all that’s good and right,
Why must my three keep out of sight
Beneath the vicious square root sign,
I wish instead I were a nine

For nine could thwart this evil trick,
with just some quick arithmetic

I know I’ll never see the sun, as 1.7321
Such is my reality, a sad irrationality

When hark! What is this I see,
Another square root of a three

Has quietly come waltzing by,
Together now we multiply
To form a number we prefer,
Rejoicing as an integer

We break free from our mortal bonds
With the wave of magic wands

Our square root signs become unglued
Your love for me has been renewed

:-)

{ 32 comments }

DaMamaJama May 11, 2008 at 12:06 PM

Just saw the clip on YouTube again – some slight modifications based on Kumar’s recitation:

Line 1: instead of “I’m sure that I will always be”, it’s “I fear that I will always be”

Line 13: instead of “As quietly co-waltzing by”, it’s “Has quietly come waltzing by”

Thanks!

ira May 18, 2008 at 10:29 PM

i love this!:)

Fabian Morales December 2, 2011 at 10:57 AM

this is a good poem from the movie that i love the best and i really think that its a good thing to say to someone that you love.

Bob Plankers May 19, 2008 at 2:54 PM

Edits are made, thanks for the corrections!

Gauravkittz July 18, 2008 at 9:43 AM

Awsm ;)

HICHAM September 18, 2008 at 6:53 AM

damn i liked that part of da movie, cuz it totally make sense, who ever thought that math and love could ever meet :P

its gr8

Angelie October 14, 2008 at 7:48 PM

I love it!
thanks for posting..

Laxamana December 6, 2008 at 3:10 PM

I love this!!!!!!!!!!

Ashley :] December 31, 2008 at 9:22 PM

This is cute :)
I lovve it!

Cooney :) February 28, 2009 at 11:44 PM

this is such a great poem, and it reminds me of my taylor
iloveyoubabe<33

ed April 10, 2009 at 10:11 AM

so very sweet, and the turn of each rhymes just takes the poem into different layers every few utterance

juice April 17, 2009 at 7:01 AM

The poem is really great. I love the rhythm and the lyrics.How great mathematician yon are.

irishpmen June 6, 2009 at 9:18 AM

this is feakin sick. i wish i maid this up.

CAPTAIN MATH June 30, 2009 at 6:36 PM

RHOMBUS!

mrniceguy July 2, 2009 at 6:11 AM

aw. i love this poem.
the movie was really fun and i was like enjoying myself, but then when i watched the part when kumar recited this poem, i was really amazed.
im also fond of writing poems and i never thought that math concepts could also produce a lovely poem. aw. this poem is so great, that both intellect and emotions made a good harmony.

Vizing July 7, 2009 at 8:25 PM

last line… instead of Your love.. it’s And love for me…

HeArTbReAKer_-_$!l) October 7, 2009 at 11:10 PM

Jus LUv It

dale December 16, 2009 at 5:52 AM

a bit reminiscent of math acapella group Klein 4…
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UTby_e4-Rhg

Harshad December 23, 2009 at 9:16 PM

Awesome poem!!!!
I love it :-)
The way Kumar recites the poem is very nice.
You need to feel this poem rather than just understanding it.

Paula July 21, 2010 at 7:16 PM

Hate math. Loved the poem.

Abbaassi Abbès August 19, 2010 at 5:47 AM

a good poem that I like . Often mathematetians need these literary descriptions;

Abbaassi Abbès August 19, 2010 at 5:50 AM

A good poem that I like .Often mathematitians need these literary descriptions.

Nightstalkerjay November 2, 2010 at 6:04 AM

I really really love this poem. it makes me crazy when i heard it!!!

rociram December 2, 2010 at 7:33 PM

i like the poem!!!

brandford April 1, 2011 at 3:23 PM

can someone please explain how root 3 relates to love … like i love this but don’t really get it

fmytaco29 February 5, 2012 at 4:28 PM

Im not sure if you’re just trolling, but whatever. The square root of three is an irrational number, which is being compared to someone who may be “odd”, or their relationships with normal people are differing from the norm. Their differences prevent them from falling in love like “regular” people (numbers that are perfect squares). However, when the square root of three is multiplied by the square root of three, it forms 3, which is a regular number. The joining of these two irregularities create a perfect number, but only if it is the exact same irregularities. This is a metaphor for true love, and two people being “made for each other.” Hope this helped :)

Denzil February 23, 2012 at 6:54 PM

That was a well constructed response to the question of how the sqrt 3 relates to love…excellent! I’m reading that exact question and response for my speech tomorrow for my fiances bday. If u wana gimme ur name I can quote u….odawise…ull be anonymous…and life goes on…LOL…:) but great stuff. Its reli nice to find something fitting to relate to in life…all da best

imdashy March 11, 2012 at 3:39 AM

Addicted to thìs poem too much…
Love it…

Sagar April 14, 2012 at 1:48 PM

Its a 3.14159265

milo gardner December 27, 2012 at 9:24 AM

The poem can be updated to include the actual method Archimedes used …

http://mathforum.org/kb/message.jspa?messageID=7943785

as expanded to the square root of 5, 6, 6 and any rational number.

milo gardner December 27, 2012 at 9:28 AM

A broader discussion of Egyptian, Greek and medieval square root is found on

http://planetmath.org/encyclopedia/EgyptianAndGreekSquareRoot.html

not the doubling of the divisor, first square root estimate, such that the

first error can be reduced my inverting the doubled divisor and multiplying …

fun stuff … easy to use too ..

Enjoy

milo gardner December 27, 2012 at 9:30 AM

oops, I hate typos

A broader discussion of Egyptian, Greek and medieval square root is found on

http://planetmath.org/encyclopedia/EgyptianAndGreekSquareRoot.html

NOTE, the second step. the doubling of the divisor, first square root estimate, such

that the first error is reduced BY inverting the doubled divisor and multiplying …

fun stuff … easy to use too ..

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